A New Start in Arizona – Addiction Rehab

A New Start in Arizona – Addiction Rehab

Between 1981 and 1999 the Inmate Complaints hearing officer in Arizona prison was William Benitez, a former prison inmate who years before and while in prison, had made a new start in Arizona. In February 1966, while in Arizona prison he created an addiction rehab program that continues to this day.

19 February 2011 and the Narconon drug rehabilitation program celebrates 45 years of helping people to completely recover from drug addiction and lead happy lives

 The story of William Benitez starts as many drug stories start – marijuana at 13, injecting drugs at 15, followed by a prison record for drug offences that led in 1964 to Benitez doing a 15/16 stretch for possession of narcotics. Story is he asked a prison guard what hope there was of him ever managing to get off drugs – the prison guard responded the kindest thing for guys like him was to have them shot.

 In the early 1960’s the times they were a changing, as reflected in the Bob Dylan song/album of January 1964. Dylan later denied his song to be about politics, the generation gap or any particular ideology. He said –“these were the only words I could find to separate aliveness from deadness. In December 1964, Benitez started his long term of imprisonment.

 While in Orientation, awaiting cell placement, in the Arizona prison, Benitez was given the words that would free him and enable him to separate the aliveness from the deadness. It was a frayed and tattered copy of the L. Ron Hubbard book, the “Fundamentals of Thought”. After reading more of Hubbard’s work, that teaches the potential for “aliveness”, and provides methods to achieve it, Benitez discovered that he had found new life, and overcome his desire for drugs – free of his addiction.

Benitez was inspired and wanted to share his discovery, with the other prisoners.

This resulted in William Benitez being given permission, in February 1966, to deliver his drug addiction recovery program, based on the works of L. Ron Hubbard, to 20 drug addicts of the prison population.

 A new start in Arizona, for Benitez became the possibility of a new start for many addicted prisoners, and others, who wanted to take the course.

 William Benitez, finding that he was eligible for immediate release due to an error in the processing of his indictment, made the choice to stay on in prison, for several months after February 1966 to ensure that the Narconon program was successfully started.

 Today the Narconon program  * includes completely drug free detoxification using natural, gentle methods that ensure all drugs and their toxic residues are completely removed from the body, reducing the risk of relapse and enabling the recovery of good health.

 Narconon works for addiction recovery in many countries of the world. Narconon uses therapeutic training routines that together with drug free detox are a comprehensive, effective program to support full recovery from addiction. Not only drug addicts can benefit from the Narconon program – a pathway to happiness for anyone who needs to sort out their life.

 A new start in Arizona, for William Benitez, in 1966, has meant addiction rehab and complete freedom from drug addiction for many people around the world using the Narconon program. Despite Dylan’s optimistic lyrics of the 1960’s, we are still immersed in social disorder, and the drug problem is increasing. People seeking aliveness over the increasing deadness of the modern structured world can choose to live – using the Narconon program – bringing real health, happiness and freedom from addiction.

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